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Murad Yakushev
Murad Yakushev

Global Street Design Guide VERIFIED



Available now, the Global Street Design Guide is a timely resource that will set a global baseline for designing streets and public spaces while redefining the role of streets in a rapidly urbanizing world. The Guide broadens how to measure the success of urban streets to include access, safety and mobility for all users, environmental quality, economic benefit, public health and overall quality of life.




Global Street Design Guide


Download Zip: https://www.google.com/url?q=https%3A%2F%2Fmiimms.com%2F2uhRUU&sa=D&sntz=1&usg=AOvVaw2I5vCxqBKiuFZlwMdMjkIK



The Global Street Design Guide is supporting practitioners to redefine the role of streets in cities around the world. Created with the input of experts from 72 cities in 42 countries, the Guide offers technical details to inform street design that prioritizes pedestrians, cyclists, and transit riders.


The Global Street Design Guide is the latest in a series of publications from the National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO) that re-imagines our urban streets as more multi-dimensional, aesthetic, efficient, safe and enjoyable spaces. The Global Street Design Guide uncovers what works in cities around the world, the cities that are trying to use streets for place making and city building. This invaluable guide brings together extremely useful information and metrics that can assist city administrations, urban designers, planners, landscape architects, and the public in forging new directions in street design. That said, this guide really needs to target city administrations and their engineering departments if it is to truly become an effective, transformative tool.


In China, city planners typically set broad goals for better street design, but decisions to proceed one way or the other are made at a political level, then filter back down to the administrative level, before becoming a part of the design parameters of most streetscape projects. Nonetheless, things are changing. I can see the information in this book as being extremely helpful with developing strategic opening salvos during the preliminary stages of large scale streetscape projects in cities where I currently practice.


All in all, the NACTO Global Street Design Guide should finds its way onto the shelves of all design and planning firms responsible for improving urban streets, regardless of where they practice. As important, it should also be in the hands of politicians, administrators, and engineers who collectively are very much in control of the direction our cities are heading.


Greg Smallenberg, FASLA, is a principal at PFS Studio, a global planning, urban design, and landscape architecture firm based in Vancouver, Canada. In addition to his North American and European work, he often undertakes large-scale planning, design and streetscape projects in Asia with Conglian Landscape Architecture and Planning Shanghai Ltd., a strategically allied joint enterprise with offices in Shanghai, Ningbo and Guangzhou, China.


The National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO) has released the Global Street Design Guide to serve as a new baseline for designing urban streets and public spaces around the world.


The guide works from the basic premise that cities are places for people. It aims to shift the parameters of designing streets from the point of view of automobile movement and safety to include access, safety, and mobility for all users and modes. Also, it prioritizes environmental quality, economic benefits, public health, and the enhancement of place and overall quality of life.


The Guide builds off the tools and tactics defined in NACTO's Urban Street Design Guide and Urban Bikeway Design Guide, while addressing a variety of street typologies, design elements, and best practices found in various contexts around the world. Its goal is to help cities unlock the potential of streets as safe, accessible, and sustainable.


Created with the input of 72 cities and 42 countries, the Global Street Design Guide (GSDG) offers technical details to inform street design that prioritizes pedestrians, cyclists, and transit riders. The guide includes real-world examples of street and intersection transformations that improve road safety as well as the overall efficiency of urban streets.


The document is a compendium of best practices from cities around the world for designing streets that prioritize walking, biking, and transit while minimizing crashes and injuries. Created with the input of transportation officials in 72 cities across 42 countries, the handbook includes 21 street typologies, 50 different street and intersection treatments, and 40 case studies. It covers a wide range of topics, from bike lane design to working with underground utilities.


The rapidly accelerating growth of cities leaves two very distinct, and very real possibilities for the planet: the first is a denser, more compact, safer, and more livable urban future. The second, if we do nothing, is a reality of ever-sprawling cities, exacerbating the issue of congestion in cities and the pollution and economic challenges posed by unsafe, unwalkable city streets. In either case, the solution is street designs that physically alter the street to reduce and even eliminate traffic deaths, while lessening the impacts of crashes that persist.


Globally, 1.25 million people are killed in traffic deaths, often the result of road design that contributes to high speeds and dangerous driving. Created with the input of 72 cities in 42 countries, the Guide presents essential street types and unique street and intersection transformations that put people first and that can be applied to streets worldwide. With over 40 case studies from cities of wide ranging populations, the Guide shows possibilities from moving more people with transit lanes, to dedicating space for vibrant economic activity like street vendors, and provides a toolkit of street designs that can be applied in a variety of contexts worldwide.


The Global Street Design Guide sets a new global baseline for designing urban streets. Recognizing that cities are places for people, the guide shifts the parameters of designing urban streets from the typical point of view of automobile movement and safety, to include access, safety, and mobility for all users, environmental quality, economic benefit, enhancement of place, public health, and overall quality of life.


Most urban streets are governed only generally by guidelines set out by national or regional governments. Though there are many street designs permissible under these guidelines, many transport agencies do not make use of them because they are not explicitly documented in formal design guidance. The guide provides examples of tested, real-world projects that have had documented success and can be adapted to streets of hundreds of different varieties and levels of development and traffic.


The guide was put together with the input of experts from 72 cities in 42 countries and offers international case studies and technical details to inform street design that prioritises, among others, children, pedestrians and cyclists.


The rise of micromobility as a global trend has been somewhat unexpected and, even if tackled from a legislative and regulatory perspective, the street requirements for these modes are still not fully developed or addressed.


Cities across the world are working towards more sustainable and equitable transportation networks. However, our cities are still largely designed for cars and existing guidelines for urban planners are centred on bikes and bike lanes but fail to incorporate a wider range of transport modes.


In this paper, we aim to provide a rational approach for the implementation of micromobility modes in current streets, a category of lightweight and small-sized transport mostly designed for the individual, although it includes modes that can carry up to three people.


The purpose of the Street Design Manual is to provide information and guidance for the design of the public right-of-way that recognizes the many and varied purposes that streets serves. The Street Design Manual is intended to assist in the implementation of the General Plan, the Transit-Oriented Development Design Guidelines, and the Land Development Code. In addition, it is intended to assist in the implementation of special requirements established through community plans, specific plans, precise plans, or other City Council adopted policy and/or regulatory documents.


Streets are dangerous places for kids: 500 children die each day in road crashes in cities around the world. Daily activities like commuting to school, running errands, or otherwise travelling around a city are often unpleasant and stressful, with children and their caretakers exposed to speeding traffic, hazardous obstacles on sidewalks that force them to walk on the roadbed, and unhealthy vehicle pollution, all negatively impacting their physical and mental wellbeing. Street designs that consider the needs of children and their caregivers have been shown to improve road safety and quality of life. City agencies are looking for guidance on strategies to reclaim their streets and make them safer, more comfortable, and more inspiring for children.


Through the Streets for Kids program, NACTO-GDCI will develop child-focused design guidance to inspire leaders, inform practitioners, and empower communities to consider the city from the eyes of a child. This new guidance will supplement the Global Street Design Guide, which was published in 2016 and set a new global standard for designing urban streets that prioritize pedestrians, cyclists, and transit riders. To date, the Global Street Design Guide has been endorsed by 37 cities and 25 organizations worldwide.


In the second phase of the program, NACTO-GDCI will work directly with practitioners to reimagine and redesign their streets to support comfortable, healthy, and inspiring environments for all children. Using guidance and specifications from the Streets for Kids supplement, NACTO-GDCI will work directly with select international cities to design and implement demonstration projects. 041b061a72


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